Divinations Using Food | Clara Champbell

DIVINATION WITH FOOD AS DIVINATORY MEDIUM

Signature theory

Man has always used plants to try and cure himself, and signature theory is the link that may exist between the shape or appearance of a plant or fruit and its therapeutic power.
In the Middle Ages, signature theory was widely used, and is still going strong today.
People of the time believed that God had left his signature in plants and fruit to help man heal himself.
2 groups of signatures were defined:
– Intrinsic signatures, specific to the plant itself, such as walnuts, tomatoes, carrots…
In walnuts, the kernels resemble the hemispheres of the brain, and the signature theory deduces that they have a beneficial effect on brain function.
Beans are said to be kidney-shaped, and to have a beneficial effect on the kidneys.
The 2nd group of signatures:
– extrinsic signatures linked to the plant’s environment, such as the willow with its feet in the water that gave us aspirin.
When Edward Stone observed a white willow in the 18th century, he exclaimed: “This tree that grows with its feet in water is never sick! It must contain compounds against fever and chills”.
This signature theory was abandoned for lack of rigorous scientific argument, but in the case of willow, for example, aspirin is made from its French bark.In ancient Greece, decoctions of willow leaves were used.

In 400 BC. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, used it to treat fever and pain. Pedanius Dioscorides, born between 20 and 40 A.D., used the bark to make his secret decoctions.
The active principle of white willow would not be discovered until much later: in 1825, Italian pharmacist Francesco Fontana succeeded in isolating salicin.
In 1829, another French pharmacist, Pierre-Joseph Leroux, optimized the process by reducing a decoction of white willow bark to powder, then filtering and concentrating it to obtain white, water-soluble crystals, which he named salicyline, since the Latin word for willow is salix.
Although in the West, the power of food was recognized, the most widespread form of divination in the 19th century did not use food as a medium for divination, and the practice of using coffee grounds, eggs and tea leaves remained in the minority, unlike Tarot readings, Oracles and palm readings, which were in the majority.
Animal scarification was no longer used.
Food is a basis for divination like any other.
It’s the clairvoyant’s connection to his or her Guides that counts. You can even create your own medium with a food or object with which you feel able to interact and create your own Cards and Oracles.
In recent years, these culinary divination methods have gained in popularity.

Caffeomancy:

Caffeomancy uses coffee grounds.

Tasseomancy

Tasseomancy is a reading of tea leaf drawings.

oenomancy

The divinatory medium here is the wine’s taste, color and density.

Aspergomancy

Aspergomancy uses fresh asparagus

Tyromancy

Tyromancy is divination with cheese.
This ancient form of divination uses the holes in cheese, the irregularities in its surface, its color and its cracks to make a reading.

Cheese was first discovered in the Neolithic period, around 7,000 BC.
Archaeological excavations at the tomb of Ptahmes in Egypt uncovered a three-millennia-old cheese inside a pot.
Ptahmes was mayor of ancient Memphis, and was also an army officer, treasury steward, royal scribe and high priest under Sety I.

Cheese-making in Northern Europe dates back 7,000 years.

Tyromancy is thought to have originated in Greece. It was also practised in Constantine d’Osroene by Bishop Sophronius, who was accused of magic and astrology at the Second Council of Ephesus in 449, and probably of this divinatory practice.

Alomancy

Alomancy uses salt.
The diviner throws salt into the air, and his interpretation is based in two stages: the first on how the salt falls to the ground, and the second on the analysis of the shapes on the ground.
Each culture and country has a practice that may differ, but what they have in common is the belief that salt has a protective and purifying virtue.

Sumo champions, in traditional Japanese wrestling, scatter salt on the ring before their fights, as a sign of purification and to ensure that the fight remains fair.

For the Greeks, as for the Hebrews and Arabs, salt is the symbol of friendship and hospitality, because it is shared, and it also represents a promise kept, a word given, because the taste of salt is indestructible.
Homer refers to its divine character, saying that it was used in sacrifices.
They offered it to the gods and attributed to it the power to ward off demons (Plutarch).

In sacred Hindu texts (the Upanishads), it is said that God is like a lump of salt dissolved in water.

For alchemists, salt is, along with sulfur and mercury, one of the three principles. It represents the means of union, the vital spirit that enables the meeting of soul and body, between the two opposing properties of nature: sulfur as the active, masculine principle, and mercury as the passive, feminine principle.

Tyromancy

Tyromancy is divination with cheese.
This ancient form of divination uses the holes in cheese, the irregularities in its surface, its color and its cracks to make a reading.

Cheese was first discovered in the Neolithic period, around 7,000 BC.
Archaeological excavations at the tomb of Ptahmes in Egypt uncovered a three-millennia-old cheese inside a pot.
Ptahmes was mayor of ancient Memphis, and was also an army officer, treasury steward, royal scribe and high priest under Sety I.

Cheese-making in Northern Europe dates back 7,000 years.

Tyromancy is thought to have originated in Greece. It was also practised in Constantine d’Osroene by Bishop Sophronius, who was accused of magic and astrology at the Second Council of Ephesus in 449, and probably of this divinatory practice.

Crommyomancy

onion divination
Crommyomancy is divination using onions to answer yes-no questions.
On one onion is written yes, on another no, and the answer to this question will be written on the first onion to sprout.

Rice

Rice, one of the world’s oldest cereals, is also used in some places for divination. A religious leader from the Chiriku Hachimangu shrine on Kyushu Island saw cracks in his rice broth and warned people to prepare for an earthquake. And he was right.

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